Sample Size Requirements for CECL Modeling

With CECL implementation looming, many bankers are questioning whether they have enough internal loan data for CECL modeling. Ensuring your data is sufficient is a critical first step in meeting the CECL requirements, as you will need to find and obtain relevant third-party data if it isn’t. This article explains in plain English how to calculate statistically sufficient sample sizes to determine whether third-party data is required. More importantly, it shows modeling techniques that reduce the required sample size. Investing in the right modeling approach could ultimately save you the time and expense of obtaining third-party data.

What CECL Means To Investors

Recent updates to U.S. GAAP will dramatically change the way financial institutions incorporate credit risk into their financial statements. The new method is called the Current Expected Credit Loss (CECL) model and will take effect over the next few years. For many institutions, CECL will mean a one-time reduction in book equity and lower stated earnings during periods of portfolio growth. These reductions occur because CECL implicitly double-counts credit risk from the time of loan origination, as we will meticulously demonstrate. But for investors, will the accounting change alter the value of your shares?