Get Started
Get a Demo
Blog Archives

RiskSpan Introduces Proprietary Measure for Plotting Burnout Effect on Prepays, Adds RPL/NPL Forecasting

ARLINGTON, Va., June 22, 2022 —

RiskSpan, a leading provider of residential mortgage and structured product data and analytics, has announced a series of new enhancements in the latest release of its award-winning Edge Platform.  

Comprehensive details of these new capabilities are available by requesting a no-obligation demo at riskspan.com.

  • Burnout Metrics MBS traders and investors can now look up a proprietary, cumulative burnout metric that quantifies the extent to which a defined pool of mortgages has continued to pay coupons above refinance rates over time. The metric goes beyond simple comparisons of note rates to historic prevailing rates by also tracking the number of times borrowers have ignored the “media effect” of repeatedly seeing rates reach record lows. Edge users can plot empirical prepay speeds as a function of burnout to help project performance of pools with various degrees of burnout. A virtual walk-through of this functionality is available here.
  • Reperforming Loans Investors in nonperforming and reperforming loans – particularly RPLs that have recently emerged from covid forbearance – can now project performance and cash flows of loans with deferred balances. Edge reads in the total debt owed (TDO) recovery method and has added key output fields like prepaid principal percent reduction and total debt owed to its cash flow report.
  • Hedge Ratios – The Edge Platform now enables traders and portfolio managers to easily compute, in one single step, the quantity of 2yr, 5yr, 10yr, or 30yr treasuries (or any combination of these or other hedges) that must be sold to offset the effective duration of assets in a given portfolio. Swaps, swaptions and other hedges are also supported. Clearly efficient and useful for any portfolio of interest-rate-sensitive assets, the functionality is proving particularly valuable to commercial banks with MSR holdings and others who require daily transparency to hedging ratios.  

### 

About RiskSpan, Inc. 

RiskSpan offers end-to-end solutions for data management, historical performance, predictive analytics and portfolio risk management on a secure, fast, and scalable platform that has earned the trust of the industry’s largest firms. Combining the strength of subject matter experts, quantitative analysts, and technologists, RiskSpan’s Edge platform integrates a range of datasets – structured and unstructured – and off-the-shelf analytical tools to provide you with powerful insights and a competitive advantage. Learn more at www.riskspan.com.  

SPEAK to An EXPERT

Striking a Proper Balance: ESG for Structured Finance

The securitization market continues to wrestle with the myriad of approaches and lack of standards in identifying and reporting ESG factors in transactions and asset classes. But much needed guidance is on the way as industry leaders work toward a consensus on the best way to report ESG for structured finance.  

RiskSpan gathered with other key industry players tackling these challenges at this month’s third annual Structured Finance Association ESG symposium in New York City. The event identified a number of significant strides taken toward shaping an industry-standard ESG framework and guidelines.  

Robust and engaging discussions across a variety of topics illustrated the critical need for a thoughtful approach to framework development. We observed a broad consensus around the notion that market acceptance would require any solution to be data supported and fully transparent. 

Much of the discussion revolved around three recurring themes: Finding a workable balance between the institutional desire for portfolio-specific measures based on raw data and the market need for a standardized scoring mechanism that everybody understands, maintaining data privacy, and assessing tradeoffs between the societal benefits of ESG investing and the added risk it can pose to a portfolio. 

Striking the Right Balance: Institution-Specific Measures vs. Industry-Standard Asset Scoring 

When it comes to disclosure and reporting, one point on a spectrum does not fit all. Investors and asset managers vary in their ultimate reporting needs and approach to assessing ESG and impact investing. On the one hand, having raw data to apply their own analysis or specific standards can be more worthwhile to individual institutions. On the other, having well defined standards or third-party ESG scoring systems for assets provides greater certainty and understanding to the market as a whole.  

Both approaches have value.

Everyone wants access to data and control over how they view the assets in their portfolio. But the need for guidance on what ESG impacts are material and relevant to structured finance remains prominent. Scores, labels, methodologies, and standards can give investors assurance a security contributes to meeting their ESG goals. Investors want to know where their money is going and if it is meaningful.

Methodologies also have to be explainable. Though there was agreement that labeled transactions are not always necessary (or achievable), integration of ESG factors in the decision process is. Reporting systems will need to link underlying collateral to external data sources to calculate key metrics required by a framework while giving users the ability to drill down to meet specific and granular analytical needs.    

Data Privacy

Detailed analysis of underlying asset data, however, highlights a second key issue: the tradeoff between transparency and privacy, particularly for consumer-related assets. Fiduciary and regulatory responsibility to protect disclosure of non-public personally identifiable information limits investor ability to access loan-level data.

While property addresses provide the greatest insight to climate risk and other environmental factors, concerns persist over methods that allow data providers to triangulate and match data from various sources to identify addresses. This in turn makes it possible to link sensitive credit information to specific borrowers.

The responsibility to summarize and disclose metrics required by the framework falls to issuers. The largest residential issuers already appreciate this burden. These issuers have expressed a desire to solve these issues and are actively looking at what they can do to help the market without sacrificing privacy. Data providers, reporting systems, and users will all need to consider the guardrails needed to adhere to source data terms of use.   

Assessing Impact versus Risk

Another theme arising in nearly all discussions centered on assessing ESG investment decisions from the two sometimes competing dimensions of impact and risk and considering whether tradeoffs are needed to meet a wide variety of investment goals. Knowing the impact the investment is making—such as funding affordable housing or the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions—is fundamental to asset selection or understanding the overall ESG position.

But what risks/costs does the investment create for the portfolio? What is the likely influence on performance?

The credit aspect of a deal is distinct from its ESG impact. For example, a CMBS may be socially positive but rent regulation can create thin margins. Ideally, all would like to maximize positive impact but not at the cost of performance, a strategy that may be contributing now to an erosion in greeniums. Disclosures and reporting capabilities should be able to support investment analyses on these dimensions.  

A disclosure framework vetted and aligned by industry stakeholders, combined with robust reporting and analytics and access to as much underlying data as possible, will give investors and asset managers certainty as well as flexibility to meet their ESG goals.   

Contact us

Webinar: Tailoring Stress Scenarios to Changing Risk Environments

July 13th | 1:00 p.m. ET

Designing market risk stress scenarios is challenging because of the disparate ways in which various risk factors impact different asset classes. No two events are exactly alike, and the Covid-19 pandemic and the Russian invasion of Ukraine each provide a case study for risk managers seeking to incorporate events without precise precedents into existing risk frameworks.
 
Join RiskSpan’s Suhrud Dagli and Martin Kindler on Wednesday, June 15th at 1 p.m. ET as they illustrate an approach for correlating rates, spreads, commodity prices and other risk factors to analogous historical geopoltical disruptions and other major market events. Market risk managers will receive an easily digestable tutorial on the math behind how to create probability distributions and reliably model how such events are most likely to impact a portfolio.

 

Featured Speakers

Suhrud Dagli

Co-Founder and CIO, RiskSpan

Photo of Martin Kindler

Martin Kindler

Managing Director, RiskSpan


Why Climate Risk Matters for Mortgage Loan & MSR Investors 

The time has come for mortgage investors to start paying attention to climate risk.

Until recently, mortgage loan and MSR investors felt that they were largely insulated from climate risk. Notwithstanding the inherent risk natural hazard events pose to housing and the anticipated increased frequency of these events due to climate change, it seemed safe to assume that property insurers and other parties in higher loss position were bearing those risks. 

In reality, these risks are often underinsured. And even in cases where property insurance is adequate, the fallout has the potential to hit investor cash flows in a variety of ways. Acute climate events like hurricanes create short-term delinquency and prepayment spikes in affected areas. Chronic risks such as sea level rise and increased wildfire risk can depress housing values in areas most susceptible to these events. Potential impacts to property insurance costs, utility costs (water and electricity in areas prone to excessive heat and drought, for example) and property taxes used to fund climate-mitigating infrastructure projects all contribute to uncertainty in loan and MSR modeling. 

Moreover, dismissing climate risk “because we are in fourth loss position” should be antithetical to any investor claiming to espouse ESG principles. After all, consider who is almost always in the first loan position – the borrower. Any mortgage investment strategy purporting to be ESG friendly must necessarily take borrower welfare into account. Dismissing climate risk because borrowers will bear most of the impact is hardly a socially responsible mindset. This is particularly true when a disproportionate number of borrowers prone to natural hazard risk are disadvantaged to begin with. 

Hazard and flood insurers typically occupy the loss positions between borrowers and investors. Few tears are shed when insurers absorb losses. But society at large ultimately pays the price when losses invariably lead to higher premiums for everybody.    

Evaluating Climate Exposure

For these and other reasons, natural hazards pose a systemic risk to the entire housing system. For mortgage loan and MSR investors, it raises a host of questions. Among them: 

  1. What percentage of the loans in my portfolio are susceptible to flood risk but uninsured because flood maps are out of date? 
  2. How geographically concentrated is my portfolio? What percentage of my portfolio is at risk of being adversely impacted by just one or two extreme events? 
  3. What would the true valuation of my servicing portfolio be if climate risk were factored into the modeling?  
  4. What will the regulatory landscape look like in coming years? To what extent will I be required to disclose the extent to which my portfolio is exposed to climate risk? Will I even know how to compute it, and if so, what will it mean for my balance sheet? 

 

Incorporating Climate Data into Investment Decision Making

Forward-thinking mortgage servicers are at the forefront of efforts to get their arms around the necessary data and analytics. Once servicers have acquired a portfolio, they assess and triage their loans to identify which properties are at greatest risk. Servicers also contemplate how to work with borrowers to mitigate their risk.  

For investors seeking to purchase MSR portfolios, climate assessment is making its way into the due diligence process. This helps would-be investors ensure that they are not falling victim to adverse selection. As investors increasingly do this, climate assessment will eventually make its way further upstream, into appraisal and underwriting processes. 

Reliably modeling climate risk first requires getting a handle on how frequently natural hazard events are likely to occur and how severe they are likely to be. 

In a recent virtual industrial roundtable co-hosted by RiskSpan and Housing Finance Strategies, representatives of Freddie Mac, Mr. Cooper, and Verisk Analytics (a leading data and analytics firm that models a wide range of natural and man-made perils) gathered to discuss why understanding climate risk should be top of mind for mortgage investors and introduced a framework for approaching it. 

WATCH THE ENTIRE ROUNDTABLE

Building the Framework

The framework begins by identifying the specific hazards relevant to individual properties, building simulated catalogs of thousands of years worth of simulated events, computing likely events simulating damage based on property construction and calculating likely losses. These forecasted property losses are then factored into mortgage performance scenarios and used to model default risk, prepayment speeds and home price impacts. 

 

Responsibility to Borrowers

One member of the panel, Kurt Johnson, CRO of mega-servicer Mr. Cooper, spoke specifically of the operational complexities presented by climate risk. He cited as one example the need to speak daily with borrowers as catastrophic events are increasingly impacting borrowers in ways for which they were not adequately prepared. He also referred to the increasing number of borrowers incurring flood damage in areas that do not require flood insurance and spoke to how critical it is for servicers to know how many of their borrowers are in a similar position.

Johnson likened the concept of credit risk layering to climate risk exposure. The risk of one event happening on the heels of another event can cause the second event to be more devastating than it would have been had it occurred in a vacuum. As an example, he mentioned how the spike in delinquencies at the beginning of the covid pandemic was twice as large among borrowers who had just recovered from Hurricane Harvey 15 months earlier than it was among borrowers who had not been affected by the storm. He spoke of the responsibility he feels as a servicer to educate borrowers about what they can do to protect their properties in adverse scenarios.


FHFA Prepayment Monitoring Reports (Q1 2022) Powered by RiskSpan’s Edge Platform

To help enforce alignment of Agency prepayments across Fannie’s and Freddie’s Uniform MBS, the Federal Housing Finance Agency publishes a quarterly monitoring report. This report compares prepayment speeds of UMBS issued by the two Agencies. The objective is to help ensure that prepayment performance remains consistent. This consistency ensures that market expectations of a Fannie-issued UMBS are fundamentally indistinguishable from those of a Freddie-issued UMBS. The two Agencies’ UMBS should be interchangeably deliverable into passthrough “TBA” trades.

This week, the FHFA released the Q1 2022 version of this report. The charts in the FHFA’s publication, which it generates using RiskSpan’s Edge Platform, compare Fannie and Freddie UMBS prepayment rates (1-month and 3-month CPRs) across a variety of coupons and vintages.

Relying on RiskSpan’s Edge Platform for this sort of analysis is fitting in that it is precisely the type of comparative analysis for which Edge was developed.

Edge allows traders, portfolio managers, and analysts to compare performance across a virtually unlimited number of loan subgroups. Users can cohort on multiple loan characteristics, including servicer, vintage, loan size, geography, LTV, FICO, channel, or any other borrower characteristic.

Edge’s easy-to-navigate user interface makes it accessible to traders and PMs seeking to set up queries and tweak constraints on the fly without having to write SQL code. Edge also offers an API for users that want programmatic access to the data. This is useful for generating customized reporting and systematic analysis of loan sectors.

Comparing Fannie’s and Freddie’s prepay speeds only scratches the surface of Edge’s analytical capabilities. Schedule a demo to see more of what the platform can do.

SPEAK TO AN EXPERT

Recent Edge Platform Updates

Edge Platform Updates


MSR Engine

The Platform’s extensive library of available MSR analytic outputs has been expanded to include Effective Recapture Rate and other Income and Expense fields.

Base servicing cost inputs for MSR assumptions have also been enhanced.


LOANS

The ETL tool for loan onboarding has been further enhanced with machine learning capabilities.

New fields for querying options and enhanced segmentation have been added. And SOFRWalSpread and SOFRSpotSpread are now captured in static analysis output.


HISTORICAL PERFORMANCE

Special Eligibility Program fields have been added to Fannie and Freddie pool data outputs along with a complementing SpecialProgram100 filter

Fannie and Freddie datasets now include CBR and CPR metrics (previously only available for Ginnies).

New support has been added for saving CoreLogic LLD queries with complement filters.

Enhanced historical date-based queries in Edge Perspective (e.g., option to run and save queries with relative factor dates rather than specifically coded date.


GET A DEMO

Daniel Fleishman Joins RiskSpan’s MSR Team

ARLINGTON, Va., May 3, 2022 — RiskSpan, a leading provider of residential mortgage and structured product data and analytics, has appointed Daniel Fleishman as Managing Director within its recently announced Mortgage Servicing Rights unit.

Fleishman’s career includes 17 years at BlackRock where he worked extensively with banks, mortgage companies and REITs to support MSR valuation, risk measurement and hedging practices. In that role, Fleishman gained deep expertise in MSR cash flow and mortgage modeling as well as experience managing diverse client needs ranging from model validation to MSR acquisition analysis. Earlier in his career, he also spent more than a decade at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

“Dan’s extensive expertise with mortgage and MSR analytics is a wonderful complement to our Edge Platform,” said Bernadette Kogler, CEO of RiskSpan. “With the MSR application starting to gain real traction, Dan is just the person to help ensure our clients are getting all they can out of the capability.”

“I am delighted about this opportunity to be a part of such a dynamic company in this new role,” said Fleishman. “I look forward to helping Edge users manage multiple loan-level datasets with ease and visualize servicing cash flows and analytics rapidly and with granularity.”

As announced last week, RiskSpan’s cloud-native MSR application is a new component of its award-winning Edge Platform. It enables investors to price MSRs and run cash flows on the fly at the loan level, opening the door to a virtually limitless array of scenario-based analytics. The flexibility afforded by RiskSpan’s parallel computing framework allows for complex net cash flow calculations on hundreds of thousands of individual mortgage loans simultaneously. The speed and scalability this affords makes the Edge Platform ideally suited for pricing even the largest portfolios of MSR assets and making timely trading decisions with confidence.


About RiskSpan, Inc.
RiskSpan offers end-to-end solutions for data management, trading risk management analytics, and visualization on a highly secure, fast, and fully scalable platform that has earned the trust of the industry’s largest firms. Combining the strength of subject matter experts, quantitative analysts, and technologists, RiskSpan’s Edge platform integrates a range of datasets – structured and unstructured – and off-the-shelf analytical tools to provide you with powerful insights and a competitive advantage. Learn more at www.riskspan.com.

SPEAK to An EXPERT

Webinar Recording: How Much Will That MSR Portfolio Really Cost You?

Recorded: June 8th | 1:00 p.m. ET

Accurately valuing a mortgage servicing rights portfolio requires accurately projecting MSR cash flows. And accurately projecting MSR cash flows requires a reliable forecast of servicing costs. Trouble is, servicing costs vary extensively from loan to loan. While the marginal cost of servicing a loan that always pays on time is next to nothing, seriously delinquent loans can easily cost hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars per year.

The best way to account for this is to forecast and assign servicing costs at the loan level – a once infeasible concept that cloud-native technology has now brought within reach. Our panelists present a novel, granular approach to servicing cost analytics and how to get to a truly loan-by-loan MSR valuation (without resorting to rep lines).

 

 

 

Featured Speakers

Venkat Mullur

SVP, Capital Markets, Ocwen

Paul Gross

Senior Quantitative Analyst, New Residential Investment Corp.

Dan Fleishman

Managing Director, RiskSpan

Joe Makepeace

Director, RiskSpan


Senior Home Equity Rises Again to $10.6 Trillion

Homeowners 62 and older saw their housing wealth grow by some $405 billion (3.8 percent) during the fourth quarter of 2021 to a record $10.6 trillion according to the latest quarterly release of the NRMLA/RiskSpan Reverse Mortgage Market Index.

The NRMLA/RiskSpan Reverse Mortgage Market Index (RMMI) rose to 370.56, another all-time high since the index was first published in 2000. The increase in older homeowners’ wealth was mainly driven by an estimated $452 billion (3.7 percent) increase in home values, offset by a $44 billion (2.3 percent) increase in senior-held mortgage debt.

For a comprehensive commentary, please see NRMLA’s press release.


How RiskSpan Computes the RMMI

To calculate the RMMI, RiskSpan developed an econometric tool to estimate senior housing value, mortgage balances, and equity using data gathered from various public resources. These resources include the American Community Survey (ACS), Federal Reserve Flow of Funds (Z.1), and FHFA housing price indexes (HPI). The RMMI represents the senior equity level at time of measure relative to that of the base quarter in 2000.[1] 

A limitation of the RMMI relates to Non-consecutive data, such as census population. We use a smoothing approach to estimate data in between the observable periods and continue to look for ways to improve our methodology and find more robust data to improve the precision of the results. Until then, the RMMI and its relative metrics (values, mortgages, home equities) are best analyzed at a trending macro level, rather than at more granular levels, such as MSA.


[1] There was a change in RMMI methodology in Q3 2015 mainly to calibrate senior homeowner population and senior housing values observed in 2013 American Community Survey (ACS).


RiskSpan Announces Cloud-Native Mortgage Servicing Rights Application

ARLINGTON, Va., Mortgage fintech leader RiskSpan announced today that it has added a Mortgage Servicing Rights (MSR) application to its award-winning on-demand analytics Edge Platform.

The application expands RiskSpan’s unparalleled loan-level mortgage analytics to MSRs, an asset class whose cash flows have previously been challenging to forecast at the loan level. Unlike conventional MSR tools that assume large numbers of loans bucketed into “rep lines” will perform identically, the Edge Platform’s granular approach makes it possible to forecast MSR portfolio net cash flows and run valuation and scenario analyses with unprecedented precision.   

RiskSpan’s MSR platform integrates RiskSpan’s proprietary prepayment and credit models to calculate option-adjusted risk metrics while also incorporating the full range of client-configurable input parameters (costs and recapture assumptions, for example) necessary to fully characterize the cash flows arising from servicing. Further, its integrated data warehouse solution enables easy access to time-series loan and collateral performance. 

“Our cloud-native platform has enabled us to achieve something that has long eluded our industry – on-demand, loan-level cash flow forecasting,” observed RiskSpan CEO Bernadette Kogler. “This has been an absolute game changer for our clients.”

Loan-level projections enable MSR investors to re-combine and re-aggregate loan-level cash flow results on the fly, opening the door to a host of additional, scenario-based analytics – including climate risk and responsible ESG analysis. The flexibility afforded by RiskSpan’s parallel computing framework allows for complex net cash flow calculations on hundreds of thousands of individual mortgage loans simultaneously. The speed and scalability this affords makes the Edge Platform ideally suited for pricing even the largest portfolios of MSR assets and making timely trading decisions with confidence.

About RiskSpan 
RiskSpan offers end-to-end solutions for data management, trading risk management analytics, and visualization on a highly secure, fast, and fully scalable platform that has earned the trust of the industry’s largest firms. Combining the strength of subject matter experts, quantitative analysts, and technologists, RiskSpan’s Edge platform integrates a range of data-sets – structured and unstructured – and off-the-shelf analytical tools to provide you with powerful insights and a competitive advantage. Learn more at www.riskspan.com. 

GET STARTED WITH A RISKSPAN EXPERT TODAY!

Get Started
Get A Demo