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Articles Tagged with: MSRs

Loans & MSRs: Managing model assumptions and tuners the easy way

One of the things that makes modeling loan and MSR cash flows hard is appropriately applying assumptions to individual loans. Creating appropriate assumptions for each loan or MSR segment is crucial to estimating realistic performance scenarios, stress testing, hedging, and valuation. However, manually creating and maintaining such assumptions can be time-consuming, error-prone, and inconsistent across different segments and portfolios.

Fortunately, hidden among some of the Edge Platform’s better-known features is a powerful and flexible way of running loan-level analytics on a portfolio using the Platform’s segment builder and loan model assumptions features.

These sometimes-overlooked features allow users to create and apply granular and customized modeling assumptions to a particular loan portfolio, based on its various, unique loan characteristics. Assumptions can be saved and reused for future analysis on different loans tapes.  This feature allows clients to effectively build and manage a complex system of models adjustment and tuners for granular sub-segments.

Applying the segment builder and loan model assumptions features, loan investors can:

  • Decouple how they run and aggregate results from how they assign modeling assumptions, and seamlessly assign different assumptions to various segments of the portfolio, based on user-defined criteria and preferences. For example, investors can assign different prepayment, default, and severity assumptions to loans based on their state, LTV, UPB, occupancy, purpose, delinquency status, loan type, collateral features, or virtually any other loan characteristic.
  • Choose from a variety of models and inputs, including RiskSpan models and vector inputs for things like CPR and CDR. Investors can define their own vector inputs as an aging curves by loan age or based on the forecast month, and apply them to different segments of the portfolio. For example, they can define their own CDR and CPR curves for consumer or C&I loans, based on the age of the loans.
  • Set up and save modeling assumptions one time, and then reference them over and over again whenever new loan tapes are uploaded. This saves time and effort and ensures consistency and accuracy in the analysis.

This hidden feature enables investors to customize their analysis and projections for different asset classes and scenarios, and to leverage the Edge Platform’s embedded cash flow, prepayment and credit models without compromising the granularity and accuracy of the results. Users can create and save multiple sets of loan model assumptions that include either static inputs, aging curves, or RiskSpan models, and apply them to any loan tape they upload and run in the forecasting UI.

Contact us and request a free demo or trial to learn more about how to use these and other exciting hidden (and non-hidden) features and how they can enhance your loan analytics.


How an MSR Analytical Solution Can Boost Your Mortgage Banking Business

And why it’s probably less expensive than you think

Mortgage servicing rights (MSRs) are complex and volatile assets that require careful management and analysis. Inherent in MSR risk management is the need to monitor portfolio performance, assess risks and opportunities, evaluate and implement risk-reducing strategies such as recapture and interest rate hedging, and effectively communicate all this to investors and regulators. Handling all this has traditionally required an enormous budget for data, software, and consultants. Many mortgage banks are left with either using outdated and inflexible internal systems or outsourcing their analytics to third parties that lack full transparency and bill clients for every request. 

Not anymore.

The answer is a cloud-native MSR analytical solution that includes slice-and-dice-able Agency loan performance data as well as the models necessary to produce valuations, risk analytics and cash flows across both MSRs and associated derivative hedges, where applicable.

By integrating data, models, and reports, this combined solution enables mortgage banks to:

  • Generate internal metrics to compare with those received from third party brokers and consultants
  • Measure the fair value and cash flows of their MSRs under different scenarios and assumptions including a variety of recapture assumptions
  • Analyze the sensitivity of their MSRs (and associated hedges) to changes in interest rates, prepayment speeds, defaults, home prices and other factors
  • Compare their portfolio’s performance and characteristics with the market and industry peers
  • Generate customized reports and dashboards to share with investors, auditors, and regulators

More specifically, RiskSpan’s comprehensive data and analytics solution enables you to do the following:

1. Check assumptions used by outside analysts to run credit and prepayment analytics

Even in cases where the analytics are provided by a third party, mortgage banks frequently benefit from having their own analytical solution. Few things are more frustrating than analytics generated by a black box with no/limited visibility into assumptions or methodology. RiskSpan’s MSR tool provides mortgage banks with an affordable means of checking the assumptions and methodologies used by outside analysts to run credit and prepayment analytics on their portfolio.

Different analysts use different assumptions and models to run credit and prepayment analytics, often leading to inconsistent results that are difficult to explain. Some analysts use historical data while others rely on forward-looking projections. Some analysts simple models while others turn to complex one. Some analysts are content with industry averages while others dig into portfolio-specific data.

Having access to a fully transparent MSR analytical solution of their own allows mortgage banks to check the assumptions and models used by outside analysts for reasonableness and consistency. In addition to helping with results validation and identification of discrepancies or errors, it also facilitates communication of the rationale and logic behind assumptions and models to investors and regulators.  Lastly, the ability for a mortgage bank to internally generate MSR valuations and cash flows allows for a greater understanding of the economic value (vs. accounting value) of the asset they hold.

2. Understand how your portfolio’s prepayment performance stacks up against the market

Prepayment risk is one of the main drivers of MSR value and volatility. Mortgage banks need to know how their portfolio’s prepayment performance compares with the market and their peers. Knowing this helps mortgage banks field questions from investors, who may be concerned about the impact of prepayments on profitability and liquidity. It also helps identify areas of improvement and opportunity for the portfolio.

RiskSpan’s MSR analytical solution helps track and benchmark portfolio prepayment performance using various metrics, including CPR and SMM. It also helps analysts understand the drivers and trends of prepayments, such as interest rates, loan age, loan type, credit score, and geographic distribution. RiskSpan’s MSR analytical solution combined with its historical performance data provides a deeper understanding of how a portfolio’s prepayment performance stacks up against the market and what factors affect it.

And it’s less expensive than you might think

You may think that deploying an MSR analytical solution is too costly and complex, as it requires a lot of data, software, and expertise. However, this is not necessarily true.

Bundling RiskSpan’s MSR analytical solution with RiskSpan’s Agency historical performance tool actually winds up saving clients money by helping them optimize their portfolios and avoid costly mistakes. The solution:

  • Reduces the need for external data, software, and consultants because all the information and tools needed are in one platform
  • Maximizes portfolio performance and profitability by helping to identify and capture opportunities and mitigate risks, including through recapture analysis and active hedging
  • Enhances reputation and credibility by improving transparency to investors and regulators

RiskSpan’s solution is affordable and easy to use, with flexible pricing and deployment options, as well as user-friendly features and support, including intuitive interfaces, interactive dashboards, and comprehensive training and guidance. Its cloud-native, usage-based pricing structure means users pay only for the compute they need (in addition to a nominal licensing fee).

Contact us to learn more about how RiskSpan’s Edge Platform can help you understand how your MSR portfolio’s performance stacks up against the market, check assumptions used by outside analysts to run credit and prepayment analytics, and, most important, save money and time.


What Do 2024 Origination Trends Mean for MSRs?

While mortgage rates remain stubbornly high by recent historical standards, accurately forecasting MSR performance and valuations requires a thoughtful evaluation of loan characteristics that go beyond the standard “refi incentive” measure.

As we pointed out in 2023, these characteristics are particularly important when it comes to predicting involuntary prepayments.

This post updates our mortgage origination trends for the first quarter of 2024 and takes a look at what they could be telling us.

Average credit scores, which were markedly higher than normal during the pandemic years, have returned and stayed near the averages observed during the latter half of the 2010s.

The most credible explanation for this most recent reversion to the mean is the fact that the Covid years were accompanied by an historically strong refinance market. Refis traditionally have higher FICO scores than purchase mortgages, and this is apparent in the recent trend.

Purchase markets are also associated with higher average LTV ratios than are refi markets, which accounts for their sharp rise during the same period.

Consequently, in 2023 and 2024, with high home prices persisting despite extremely high interest rates, new first-time homebuyers with good credit continue to be approved for loans, but with higher LTV and DTI ratios.

Between rates and home prices, ​​borrowers simply need to borrow more now than they would have just a few years ago to buy a comparable house. This is reflected not just in the average DTI and LTV, but also the average loan size (below) which, unsurprisingly, continues to trend higher as well.

Recent large increases to the conforming loan limit are clearly also contributing to the higher average loan size.

What, then, do these origination trends mean for the MSR market?

The very high rates associated with newer originations clearly translate to higher risk of prepayments. We have seen significant spikes in actual speeds when rates have taken a leg down — even though the loans are still very new. FICO/LTV/DTI trends also potentially portend higher delinquencies down the line, which would negatively impact MSR valuations.

Nevertheless, today’s MSR trading market remains healthy, and demand is starting to catch up with the high supply as more money is being raised and put to work by investors in this space. Supply remains high due to the need for mortgage originators to monetize the value of MSR to balance out the impact from declining originations.

However, the nature of the MSR trade has evolved from the investor’s perspective. When rates were at historic lows for an extended period, the MSR trade was relatively straightforward as there was a broader secular rate play in motion. Now, however, bidders are scrutinizing available deals more closely — evaluating how speeds may differ from historical trends or from what the models would typically forecast.

These more granular reviews are necessarily beginning to focus on how much lower today’s already very low turnover speeds can actually go and the extent of lock-in effects for out-of-the-money loans at differing levels of negative refi incentive. Investors’ differing views on prepays across various pools in the market will often be the determining factor on who wins the bid.

Investor preference may also be driven by the diversity of an investor’s other holdings. Some investors are looking for steady yield on low-WAC MSRs that have very small prepayment risk while other investors are seeking the higher negative convexity risk of higher-WAC MSRs — for example, if their broader portfolio has very limited negative convexity risk.

In sum, investors have remained patient and selective — seeking opportunities that best fit their needs and preferences.

So what else do MSR holders need to focus on that may may impact MSR valuations going forward? 

The impact from changes in HPI is one key area of focus.

While year-over-year HPI remains positive nationally, servicers and other investors really need to look at housing values region by region. The real risk comes in the tails of local home price moves that are often divorced from national trends. 

For example, HPIs in Phoenix, Austin, and Boise (to name three particularly volatile MSAs) behaved quite differently from the nation as a whole as HPIs in these three areas in particular first got a boost from mass in-migration during the pandemic and have since come down to earth.

Geographic concentrations within MSR books will be a key driver of credit events. To that end, we are seeing clients beginning to examine their portfolio concentration as granularly as zipcode level. 

Declining home values will impact most MSR valuation models in two offsetting ways: slower refi speeds will result in higher MSR values, while the increase in defaults will push MSRs back downward. Of these two factors, the slower speeds typically take precedence. In today’s environment of slow speeds driven primarily by turnover, however, lower home prices are going to blunt the impact of speeds, leaving MSR values more exposed to the impact of higher defaults.


RiskSpan to Launch Usage-based Pricing for its Edge Platform at SFVegas 2024 

New innovative pricing model offers lower costs, transparency, and flexibility for analytics users 

RiskSpan, a top provider of cloud-based analytics solutions for loans, MSRs, structured products and private credit, announced today the launch of a usage-based pricing model for its Edge Platform. The new pricing model enables clients flexibility to pay only for the compute they use. It also gives clients access to the full platform, including data, models, and analytics, without having to license individual product modules. 

Usage-based pricing is a trend that reflects the evolving nature of analytics and the increasing demand for more flexible, transparent, and value-driven pricing models. It is especially suited for the dynamic and diverse needs of analytics users, whose data volumes, usage patterns, and analytical complexity requirements often fluctuate with the markets.

RiskSpan was an early adopter of the Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud in 2010. Its new usage-based pricing, powered by the AWS cloud, enables RiskSpan to invoice its clients based on user-configured workloads, which can scale up or down as needed. 

“Usage-based pricing is a game-changer for our clients and the industry,” said Bernadette Kogler, CEO of RiskSpan. “It aligns our pricing with the value we deliver and the outcomes we enable for our clients. It also eliminates the waste and inefficiency of paying for unused, fixed-fee compute capacity, year after year in long-term, set price contracts. Now our clients can optimize their spending while experimenting with all the features our platform has to offer.”

“We are excited RiskSpan chose AWS to launch its new pricing model. Our values are aligned in earning trust through transparent variable pricing that allows our customers to innovate and remain agile.” said Ben Schreiner, Head of Business Innovation, at Amazon Web Services. “By leveraging the latest in AWS technology, including our generative AI services, RiskSpan is accelerating the value they deliver to their customers, and ultimately, the entire financial services industry.”

Usage-based pricing offers several benefits for RiskSpan clients, including: 

  • Lower Costs: Clients pay only for what they need, rather than being locked into an expensive contract that may not suit their current or future situation. 
  • Cost Sharing: Clients can share costs across the enterprise and better manage expense based on usage by individual functions and business units. 
  • Transparency: Clients can monitor their usage and directly link their analytics configuration and usage to their results and goals. They can also better control their spending by tracking their usage and seeing how it affects their bill. 
  • Flexibility: Clients can experiment with different features and options of RiskSpan’s Edge Platform, as they are not restricted by a predefined package or plan. 

For a free demo, visit https://riskspan.com/ubp/.

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About RiskSpan, Inc. 

RiskSpan offers cloud-native SaaS analytics for on-demand market risk, credit risk, pricing and trading. With an unparalleled team of data science experts and technologists, RiskSpan is the leader in data as a service and end-to-end solutions for loan-level data management and analytics.

Its mission is to be the most trusted and comprehensive source of data and analytics for loans and structured finance investments. Learn more at www.riskspan.com.


The future of analytics pricing is RiskSpan’s Usage-based delivery model

Usage-based pricing model brings big benefits to clients of RiskSpan’s Edge Platform

Analytic solutions for loans, MSRs and structured products are typically offered as software-as-a-service (SaaS) or “on-prem” products, where clients pay a monthly or annual fee to access the software and its features. The compute needed to run analytic workloads is typically purchased in advance and is fixed regardless of the need or use case.  

However, this traditional pricing model is not always the best fit for the dynamic and diverse needs of analytics users. It is technologically outdated and does not meet users where they are – with varying data volumes, usage patterns, and analytical complexity requirements that fluctuate with the markets. It is simply wasteful for companies to pay for unused, fixed-fee compute capacity, year-after-year in long-term, set price contracts, when their needs don’t require it. 

Usage-based pricing is a trend that reflects the evolving nature of analytics and the increasing demand for more flexible, transparent, and value-driven pricing models.

RiskSpan has just announced the release of industry-innovating usage-based pricing that allows clients to scale up or down, based on their needs. Further, clients of the RiskSpan platform will now benefit from access to the full Edge Platform, including data, models and analytics – eliminating the need to license individual product modules. The Platform supports loans, MSRs and securities, with growing capabilities around private credit. Analyzing these assets can be compute- and data-intensive because of the need for collateral (loan-level) data and models to price, value, and calculate risk metrics.

A Single Platform
Integrated Data | Trade Analytics | Risk Management

Core Engine

Usage-based pricing is an innovative alternative approach based on user-configured workloads. It enables RiskSpan to invoice its clients according to how much compute they actually need and use, rather than a fixed fee based on the modules they purchased during the last budget cycle.  

Usage-based pricing benefits RiskSpan clients in several ways, including: 

    • Lower Costs: Clients pay only for what they need, rather than being locked into an expensive contract that may not suit their current or future situation.

    • Cost-Sharing Across the Enterprise: Clients can share costs across the enterprise and better manage expense based on usage by internal functions and business units.

    • Transparency: Clients can monitor their usage and directly link their analytics configuration and usage to their results and goals. They can also better control their spending, as they can track their usage and see how it affects their bill.

    • Flexibility: Clients can experiment with different features and options of the Platform, as they are not restricted by a predefined package or plan.

Usage-based pricing is not a one-size-fits-all solution, and it may not be suitable for every organization. Based on needs, large enterprise workloads will require specific, customized licensing and may benefit from locked in compute that comes with volume discounts.

Bottom Line on RiskSpan’s Usage-based Pricing Model

CONS of Traditional Fixed Fee Pricing PROS of Usage-Based Pricing
Flat-fee pricing models force customers to pay for unused capacity​. Lower Costs — Pay only for what you use, not the wasted capacity of a dedicated cluster
Unused capacity cannot be shared across the enterprise, which translates into wasted resources and higher costs. Cost Sharing — Costs can be shared across the enterprise to better manage expense based on usage by your internal functions and business units
Fixed pricing models make it difficult for customers to scale up or down as needed. Transparency — Transparent pricing that fits your specific analytics workload (size, complexity, performance)
Traditional “product module-based” purchasing runs the risk of over-buying on features that will not be used. Flexibility — Scale up and scale down your use as new and in-place features become useful to you under different market conditions

With the introduction of usage-based pricing, RiskSpan is adding core value to its Edge Platform and a low-cost entry point to bring its solution to a wider base of clients. Its industry-leading capabilities solve challenges facing various users in the loans, MSR, and structured portfolio domains. For example:

    1. Loan/MSR Trader seeks analytics to support bidding on pools of loans and/or MSRs. Their usage is ad-hoc and will benefit from usage-based pricing. Traders and investors can analyze prepay and credit performance trends by leveraging RiskSpan’s 20+ years of historical performance datasets.

    1. Securities Trader (Agency or Non-Agency) wants more flexibility to set their prepay or credit model assumptions to run ad-hoc scenario analysis not easily handled by their current vendor.

    1. Risk Manager wants another source of valuation for periodic MSR and loan portfolios to enhance decision making and compare against the marks from their third-party valuation firm. 

    1. Private Credit Risk Manager needs a built-for-purpose private credit analytics system to properly run risk metrics. Users can run separate and run ad hoc analysis on these holdings.

For more specific information about how RiskSpan will structure pricing with various commitment levels, click below to tell us about your needs, and a representative will be in touch with you shortly. 


Snowflake Tutorial Series: Episode 3

Using External Tables Inside Snowflake to work with Freddie Mac public data (13 million loans across 116 fields)

Using Freddie Mac public loan data as an example, this five-minute tutorial succinctly demonstrates how to:

  1. Create a storage integration
  2. Create an external stage
  3. Grant access to stage to other roles in Snowflake
  4. List objects in a stage
  5. Create a format file
  6. Read/Query data from external stage without having to create a table
  7. Create and use an external table in Snowflake

This is the third in a 10-part tutorial series demonstrating how RiskSpan’s Snowflake integration makes mortgage and structured finance analytics easier than ever before.

Episode 1, Setting Up a Database and Uploading 28 Million Mortgage Loans, is available here.

Episode 2, Using Python User-Defined Functions in Snowflake SQL, is available here.

Future topics will include:

  • OLAP vs OLTP and hybrid tables in Snowflake
  • Time Travel functionality, clone and data replication
  • Normalizing data and creating a single materialized view
  • Dynamic tables data concepts in Snowflake
  • Data share
  • Data masking
  • Snowpark: Data analysis (pandas) functionality in Snowflake

RiskSpan’s Snowflake Tutorial Series: Ep. 2

Learn how to use Python User-Defined Functions in Snowflake SQL

Using CPR computation for a pool of mortgage loans as an example, this six-minute tutorial succinctly demonstrates how to:

  1. Query Snowflake data using SQL
  2. Write and execute Python user-defined functions inside Snowflake
  3. Compute CDR using Python UDF inside Snowflake SQL

This is this second in a 10-part tutorial series demonstrating how RiskSpan’s Snowflake integration makes mortgage and structured finance analytics easier than ever before.

Episode 1, Setting Up a Database and Uploading 28 Million Mortgage Loans, is available here.

Future topics will include:

  • External Tables (accessing data without a database)
  • OLAP vs OLTP and hybrid tables in Snowflake
  • Time Travel functionality, clone and data replication
  • Normalizing data and creating a single materialized view
  • Dynamic tables data concepts in Snowflake
  • Data share
  • Data masking
  • Snowpark: Data analysis (pandas) functionality in Snowflake

What Do 2023 Origination Trends Mean for MSRs?

When it comes to forecasting MSR performance and valuations, much is made of the interest rate environment, and rightly so. But other loan characteristics also play a role, particularly when it comes to predicting involuntary prepayments.

So let’s take a look at what 2023 mortgage originations might be telling us.

Average credit scores, which were markedly higher than normal during the pandemic years, have returned during the first part of 2023 to averages observed during the latter half of the 2010s.

FICO

The most credible explanation for this most recent reversion to the mean is the fact that the Covid years were accompanied by an historically strong refinance market. Refis traditionally have higher FICO scores than purchase mortgages, and this is apparent in the recent trend.

Purchase markets are also associated with higher average LTV ratios than are refi markets, which accounts for their sharp rise during the same period

LTV

Consequently, in 2023, with high home prices persisting despite extremely high interest rates, new first-time homebuyers with good credit continue to be approved for loans, but with higher LTV and DTI ratios.

DTI

Between rates and home prices,​​borrowers simply need to borrow more now than they would have just a few years ago to buy a comparable house. This is reflected not just in the average DTI and LTV, but also the average loan size (below) which, unsurprisingly, is trending higher as well.

Recent large increases to the conforming loan limit are clearly also contributing to the higher average loan size.

WOLS

What, then, do these origination trends mean for the MSR market?

The very high rates associated with newer originations clearly translate to higher risk of prepayments. We have seen significant spikes in actual speeds when rates have taken a leg down — even though the loans are still very new. FICO/LTV/DTI trends also potentially portend higher delinquencies down the line, which would negatively impact MSR valuations.

Nevertheless, today’s MSR trading market remains healthy, and demand is starting to catch up with the high supply as more money is being raised and put to work by investors in this space. Supply remains high due to the need for mortgage originators to monetize the value of MSR to balance out the impact from declining originations.

However, the nature of the MSR trade has evolved from the investor’s perspective. When rates were at historic lows for an extended period, the MSR trade was relatively straightforward as there was a broader secular rate play in motion. Now, however, bidders are scrutinizing available deals more closely — evaluating how speeds may differ from historical trends or from what the models would typically forecast.

These more granular reviews are necessarily beginning to focus on how much lower today’s already very low turnover speeds can actually go and the extent of lock-in effects for out-of-the-money loans at differing levels of negative refi incentive. Investors’ differing views on prepays across various pools in the market will often be the determining factor on who wins the bid.

Investor preference may also be driven by the diversity of an investor’s other holdings. Some investors are looking for steady yield on low-WAC MSRs that have very small prepayment risk while other investors are seeking the higher negative convexity risk of higher-WAC MSRs — for example, if their broader portfolio has very limited negative convexity risk.

In sum, investors have remained patient and selective — seeking opportunities that best fit their needs and preferences.

So what else do MSR holders need to focus on that may may impact MSR valuations going forward? 

The impact from changes in HPI is one key area of focus.

While year-over-year HPI remains positive nationally, servicers and other investors really need to look at housing values region by region. The real risk comes in the tails of local home price moves that are often divorced from national trends. 

For example, HPIs in Phoenix, Austin, and Boise (to name three particularly volatile MSAs) behaved quite differently from the nation as a whole as HPIs in these three areas in particular first got a boost from mass in-migration during the pandemic and have since come down to earth.

Geographic concentrations within MSR books will be a key driver of credit events. To that end, we are seeing clients beginning to examine their portfolio concentration as granularly as zipcode level. 

Declining home values will impact most MSR valuation models in two offsetting ways: slower refi speeds will result in higher MSR values, while the increase in defaults will push MSRs back downward. Of these two factors, the slower speeds typically take precedence. In today’s environment of slow speeds driven primarily by turnover, however, lower home prices are going to blunt the impact of speeds, leaving MSR values more exposed to the impact of higher defaults.


RiskSpan Incorporates Flexible Loan Segmentation into Edge Platform

ARLINGTON, Va., March 3, 2023 — RiskSpan, a leading technology company and the most comprehensive source for data management and analytics for residential mortgage and structured products, has announced the incorporation of Flexible Loan Segmentation functionality into its award-winning Edge Platform.

The new functionality makes Edge the only analytical platform offering users the option of alternating between the speed and convenience of rep-line-level analysis and the unmatched precision of loan-level analytics, depending on the purpose of their analysis.

For years, the cloud-native Edge Platform has stood alone in its ability to offer the computational scale necessary to perform loan-level analyses and fully consider each loan’s individual contribution to a mortgage or MSR portfolio’s cash flows. This level of granularity is of paramount importance when pricing new portfolios, taking property-level considerations into account, and managing tail risks from a credit/servicing cost perspective.

Not every analytical use case justifies the computational cost of a full loan-level analysis, however. For situations where speed requirements dictate the use of rep lines (such as for daily or intra-day hedging needs), the Edge Platform’s new Flexible Loan Segmentation affords users the option to perform valuation and risk analysis at the rep line level.

Analysts, traders and investors take advantage of Edge’s flexible calculation specification to run various rate and HPI scenarios, key rate durations, and other calculation-intensive metrics in an efficient and timely manner. Segment-level results run at both loan and rep line level can be easily compared to assess the impacts of each approach. Individual rep lines are easily rolled up to quickly view results on portfolio subcomponents and on the portfolio as a whole.

Comprehensive details of this and other new capabilities are available by requesting a no-obligation demo at riskspan.com.

This new functionality is the latest in a series of enhancements that further the Edge Platform’s objective of providing frictionless insight to Agency MBS traders and investors, knocking down barriers to efficient, clear and data-driven valuation and risk assessment.

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About RiskSpan, Inc. 

RiskSpan offers cloud-native SaaS analytics for on-demand market risk, credit risk, pricing and trading. With our data science experts and technologists, we are the leader in data as a service and end-to-end solutions for loan-level data management and analytics. Our mission is to be the most trusted and comprehensive source of data and analytics for loans and structured finance investments. Learn more at www.riskspan.com.


RiskSpan’s Snowflake Tutorial Series: Ep. 1

Learn how to create a new Snowflake database and upload large loan-level datasets

The first episode of RiskSpan’s Snowflake Tutorial Series has dropped!

This six-minute tutorial succinctly demonstrates how to:

  1. Set up a new Snowflake #database
  2. Use SnowSQL to load large datasets (28 million #mortgage loans in this example)
  3. Use internal staging (without a #cloud provider)

This is this first in what is expected to be a 10-part tutorial series demonstrating how RiskSpan’s Snowflake integration makes mortgage and structured finance analytics easier than ever before.

Future topics will include:

  • Executing complex queries using python functions in Snowflake’s SQL
  • External Tables (accessing data without a database)
  • OLAP vs OLTP and hybrid tables in Snowflake
  • Time Travel functionality, clone and data replication
  • Normalizing data and creating a single materialized view
  • Dynamic tables data concepts in Snowflake
  • Data share
  • Data masking
  • Snowpark: Data analysis (pandas) functionality in Snowflake

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